WWI Photo Post – Lincoln Leslie Loper w/ Gas Mask Returns Home From France January 1919


Lincoln Leslie Loper served in France with a military medical unit during the last year of WWI.  Born and raised in Iowa, Loper  eventually worked his way to Washington, living in Seattle as early as 1942.  It’s tough to trace an individual based on scant information, but I’ve been able to deduce that he passed away in 1972 based on his military records.

Lincoln L. Loper in a Gas Mask, 1919

Lincoln L. Loper in a Gas Mask, 1919

LIncoln Loper Postcard Backside

Lincoln Loper Postcard Backside

WWI Burlington, VT Portrait Photo – William W. Putnam 310th Cav. Fort Ethan Allen


William W. Putnam of Thomaston, Maine came to Vermont as part of the Machine Gun Troop of the 310th Cav in 1918.  He posed for a photo in a Burlington, VT photo studio while training at Fort Ethan Allen.  He had his photo taken in Burlington after his promotion to sgt (1/1918) at the studio of H. Raymond Paige of 22 Church Street.

 

Maine service record:
Name: William W. Putnam
Serial Number: 371805
Birth Place: Brewer, Maine
Birth Date: 03 Sep 1897
Residence: Thomaston
Comment: Enl: Ft. Slocum, N. Y., May 10/18. Pvt; Sgt Aug. 1/18. Org: MG Tr 310 Cav to disch. Overseas service: None. Hon disch on demob: Dec. 20, 1918.

 

William Putnam441

 

 

William Putnam442

Henry  Raymond Paige Studio Logo, Burlington, VT

 

January 1918 Article About the Return of Raymond Paige

January 1918 Article About the Return of Raymond Paige

 

Raymond Paige in 1920

Raymond Paige in 1920

 

WWI 42nd Division Doughboy Sends Home a Real Photo Postcard


Ever wonder how doughboys sent their photo postcards home?  I actually don’t own a single example of a postmarked photo postcard from the war, but recently came across a grouping that contained an envelope and postcard sent home by a 42nd Division soldier.  A member of the 151st Field Artillery, Frank Svec sent home a studio portrait shot of himself.  Not incredibly rare, but a good example of how WWI photos were sent during the war.  The 42nd Division is one of my favorite divisions, so this is an addition “kicker”.