100 Years Later: Vermont’s Entry into the First World War


It has been called THE GREAT WAR and THE WAR TO END ALL WARS.

According to Tweets from WWI, the American intervention in the war can be summarized as:

There is only room for one: ‘s idealism vs. German ‘s imperialism (US caricature).

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Today, we know it as World War One (WWI). It began in 1914 and ended with an armistice at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month in 1918. The global toll had already reached nearly 40 million casualties, including American losses of 117,465 dead and 204,002 wounded.

100 Years Ago Today

After War was officially declared (House and Senate) on April 6th, 1917 the U.S. began preparations to enter the quagmire of European trench warfare.

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Vermonter John Corcoran (r) in WWI

In June of 1917, U.S. transport ships carrying nearly 15,000 U.S. troops (many from New England) in the American Expeditionary Force (AEF) approached the shores of France, these soldiers would join the Allied fight against the Central Powers.  They disembarked at the port of Saint Nazaire; the landing site had been kept secret because of the menace of German submarines, but by the time the Americans had lined up to take their first salute on French soil, an enthusiastic crowd had gathered to welcome them. However, the “Doughboys,” as the British referred to the green American troops, were said to be untrained and ill-equipped, untested for the rigors of fighting along the Western Front.

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PortraitsofWar’s WWI Smithsonian Cover

As U.S. troops landed in France, Americans were mindful of a 125+ year old debt owed that nation. France had been the colonists’ most important ally during the Revolutionary War, having supplied money, material and military brains. The Marquis de Lafayette had fought beside Patriot soldiers, equipping some of them at his own expense. He won the affection of George Washington and became a hero to the young nation. Urged on by Lafayette, France had sent ships, troops, and arms that played a key role in the Patriots’ victory. In early July 1917, the newly arrived American Expeditionary Force troops marched under the Arc de Triomphe, cheered by the people of Paris. In a ceremony at Lafayette’s tomb, where the Frenchman lies buried under dirt from Bunker Hill, an American officer lay down a wreath of pink and white roses. Another officer stepped forward, snapped a salute, and declared: “Lafayette, we are here!”

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Earl F. Lavallee of Winooski, VT in Germany, 1918.

As followers of PortraitsofWar will know, we take a great pride in providing interesting and never-before-seen imagery and narration of wartime photography ranging from the American Civil War to the Korean War. In most cases, I take an authentic photograph from my personal collection and work towards uncovering various details that hopefully elucidate some aspect of the photo.

101st Ammunition Train

In this case, I worked the other way around. My familiarity with the First World War history of the State of Vermont is well known to followers of this blog as well as within my home state. One of my favorite Vermont units to serve in the war was the 101st Ammunition Train of the 26th “Yankee Division”.

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Jeannine Russell (Vermont Agency of Transportation Archaeology Officer), Myself (Vermont Agency of Transportation Archaeologist) and David Schütz (Vermont State Curator) inspecting WWI flags

Only a week ago I was lucky enough to be invited into the bowels of the Vermont Historical Society storage area to inspect a series of American Civil War flags with a few colleagues of mine from work. While in the holding area I mentioned that a series of WWI groups had donated regimental flags and/or guidons to the State of Vermont in the years following the war.

Although I can be a bit fuzzy in my recollections, I apparently had my facts straight and we moved a series of shelves to uncover the aforementioned flags. As I fingered through the labels I instantly recognized the attribution: 101st flags. Please see below for a bit of insight into my recollection…

vermont unit

101st Ammunition Train Guidon Donation Alert, Burlington Free Press, February, 1919

Ok – So my first attempt at searching on the Library of Congress Newspaper website turned up only one reference to the flags, I kept searching (tried COLORS) and came up with this…

flagspresented

Flags presented

The above snippit from a 1919 Burlington Free Press article reads:

Colors Presented

War Flags and Shields Presented to State

Montpelier, Oct. 23 – The presentation of the colors and shields of the organizations from Vermont participating in the the world war occurred this evening in the State House with some 200 veterans attending and over 400 spectators in the seats of the representative hall and balcony.

The services were fitting and were attended by many of the men who have been prominent in the connection with the war. Col. F.B. Thomas presided over the exercise and the program carried out consisted of the “History of the 57th Pioneer Infantry” Capt. Ernest W. Gibson – Brattleboro

Presentation of colors – First Vermont and 57th Pioneer Infantry, Col. F. B. Thomas… History and presentation of colors of 302nd Field Artillery , Color Sergeant Albert J. Seguin of Newport.

History and presentation of 101st Ammunition Train Col. William J. Keville of Boston Mass.

Presentation of guidon, Company E. 101st Ammunition Train, Capt. Harold M. Howe of Northfield, VT.

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Ca. 1919 Co. E101st Ammunition Train guidon photo (from Brennan C. Gauthier Collection)

Presentation of guidon, Company F 101st Ammunition Train, Captain McMath

Presentation of guidon, Company G, 101st Ammunition Train, Chester Mooney of Newport.

As I stated earlier, I remembered the fact that the 101st and the 302nd had presented the State of Vermont with standards and guidons from prominent units representing Vermont involvement in the war. The following photos show the results of my inquiries:

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Left to Right: Jeannine Russell (Vermont Agency of Transportation Archaeology Officer), Myself (Vermont Agency of Transportation Archaeologist) an David Schütz (Vermont State Curator)

In the above photo we have just unrolled the 101st Ammunition Train guidons from their muslin cocoons. Present are representative samples of Co. C, G, F and E of the 101st. Each of these matches with the above 1919 article. How amazing is it to read a 98 year old article about a presentation and see the EXACT pieces in living color?

I’m particular excited about the Co. E guidon. I own a ratty panoramic photo taken of the unit when they returned in 1919. Click here to see ever single facial feature of the men in that group.

Ok – so here’s a photo of the guidon taken right before donation in 1919:

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And here’s the guidon today (my big head is at the left edge of the frame):

F company 1

WWI guidons of the 101st Ammunition Train

Also, I requested that the regimental flag of the 302nd Field Artillery be brought out for photographing. Special thanks to Jonathan Croft for being the photographer!

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302nd Field Artillery

Has it really been 100 years?

Local Burlington, VT WWI Headstone Research – William F. Duggan (1895-1970)


My daily jogging routine takes me past St. Joseph Cemetery in Burlington, VT; this cemetery is fairly discrete with no over-the-top entryway and is located in a section of Burlington typically used as a pass-between for the Old North End and the UVM campus.  St. Joseph is the oldest Catholic cemetery in Burlington, and primarily consists of Irish-Catholic and French-Catholic burials.  The cemetery property was donated by Col. Archibald Waterman Hyde (1786-1847) in 1830, a War of 1812 veteran who served as Barracks Master in Burlington during the war.  According to his FindaGrave.com entry, Hyde:

“In his later years he affected antique costumes and habits, dressed in small-clothes, wore knee- and shoe-buckles, or long boots, with a long cue hanging down his back; eulogized the forefathers, and lamented the degeneracy of their descendants. He was a man of his word, a faithful friend, open-handed to the poor. He never married.”

An interesting side-piece to this post! (So many questions about Hyde….)  Now let’s focus on William F. Duggan…

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William F. Duggan Headstone

I always take pause to check out the various headstones as I do my pre and post run stretches, and I take particular notice of interesting military-related graves. In this case, I found a semi-obscured headstone with three small American flags clearly marking a veteran grave.  I snapped a picture in hopes of researching and posting the info to PortraitsofWar.  This post is dedicated to William F. Duggan – just an ordinary Vermont WWI veteran who deserves a place in the digital world!  I hope a few of his relatives chime in…

Biography

William Francis Duggan was born on September 25th, 1895 in Burlington, Chittenden County, VT.  The son of William Amos and Katherine M. Duggan, he married Georgianna Esther Hall of 19 Cherry Street, Burlington on June 6th, 1916.

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1st Marriage Registration Card

William was sent away to war a few years later and served in a number of disparate units during the three months he spent in France and Germany during the war; he served stateside with the 52nd Aero Squadron from March until June 17th, 1918, and then transferred to Battery B of the 110th Field Artillery (29th Division) until July 10th, he then transferred again to Company L of the 340th Infantry Regiment, 85th Division, and later to Battery F of the 137th Field Artillery, 41st Division.   He served overseas with the 137th from October 6th, 1918 until December 24th, 1918.  He left Europe and returned to the US on January 17th, 1919, where he was summarily discharged.  His home at the time (and for years prior) was 57 Rose Street, Burlington, Chittenden County, VT:

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Duggan’s Childhoom Home – 57 Rose Street, Burlington

William F. Duggan’s Wartime Record

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WWI Service Record

With William’s WWI service record researched, I began to look into his pre and postwar life in Burlington.  He lived in the my community, and such, I’m interested in his comings and goings on the streets that I frequent.  It turns out that Will likely knew the streets of Burlington better than most 2016 residents!  During his lifetime, William F. Duggan worked as a streetcar operator, fireman,used furniture salesman, taxi driver (many years), and as a Burlington Electric employee.  Quite the credentials!

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WWI Draft Card – Note STREETCAR Operator

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1928 Burlington Directory – Note occupation as second hand furniture salesman

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1944 Burlington Directory – Note occupation as fireman at Fort Ethan Allen

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WWII Draft Card – Note occupation as Burlington Light Department

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1954 Burlington Directory – Note occupation as taxi driver at the corner of Main and St. Paul St.

1962Directory

1962 Burlington Directory – Finally retired!  Woo Hoo!

 

 

Although I can’t find the marriage record for his second marriage, I do know that he remarried later in life and had six children with his second wife.  William and Mary Louis Rielling had six children together – Patricia, Dorothy (Quintin), Mary (Kidder), Elizabeth (Rousseau), Kathleen (Dutra), and Robert Duggan.  As of the writing of this post, only Patricia has passed.

William sounds like an incredible guy, and I hope to learn more about him and his exploits through this post. A wartime photo of him would be the icing on the cake!

I plan to trim a bit of the grass around his headstone to allow for easier view, and he will certainly be a part of my daily run routine for years to come 🙂

 

 

 

WWI University of Vermont 1917 Alumni Navy Veteran – LOST AT SEA – Carroll Goddard Page UPDATE!


PortraitsofWar researched the collegiate times of Carroll Goddard Page back in August of 2011 in hopes of raising interest in the strange loss of the USS Cyclops; the presumed death of this UVM alumni during WWI was also a major focus of our research.  Since then, we’ve looked into various aspects of the University of Vermont during WWI with highlights including panoramic photos taken during the war years as well as photographs of local boys who served in France and Germany in 1917-1921 respectively.

Why an Update?

After seeing a recent eBay auction pass during a common search routine, PortraitsofWar’s author instantly recognized the sitter as Carroll Goddard Page.  What are the chances?  At a reasonable $11.73, we made the purchase in hopes of donating the image to the University of Vermont’s Special Collections unit located in the library.

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eBay Purchase Title and Price

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2016 eBay Purchase – Carroll Goddard Page

 

_________________________PREVIOUS POST_____________________________

 

The 2011 post below was created with scant information based on a visit to the UVM Library Annex (when it was still open to researchers) in hopes of tracking down students who served with distinction in WWI.  Our main focus that day was to research soldiers/sailors/marines/nurses who were wounded in action (WIA) or killed in action (KIA) during their period of service.  Interest was also paid to servicemen/women who died of disease or complications during their time in service.

 

Page in Washington, D.C – Courtesy of the University of Vermont Special Collections

One of the biggest mysteries of the US NAVY during WWI is the inexplicable loss of the USS Cyclops (AC-4) while transporting 300+ passengers/crew and a load of manganese ore from Brazil to Baltimore in 1918.  Carroll Goddard Page, UVM Class of 1917, was aboard as paymaster when the ship disappeared without a trace on March 4th, 1918.  Although a structural failure in the engine is likely the cause, we may never know the true reasons behind the disappearance.
Carroll was a member of the Class of 1917, originally from Hyde Park, he studied business and banking at UVM.  His nickname was “flunko”, and his ambitions at UVM included “raising a mustache that resembles a cross between the Kaiser’s and a hair-lip.”

1917 Yearbook Entry

Carroll’s UVM Alumni Database Entry

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Carroll and Delta Psi in 1916

Special thanks to the University of Vermont Special Collections!

8th Vermont Infantry Regiment Civil War Soldier – Henry N. Derby Dies of Disease in Louisiana


Henry N. Derby was born in Wardsboro, VT on April 15th, 1846, later moved to Townshend where he enlisted for Federal service on December 8th, 1863 and mustered in on December 29th.  He signed up for a three year enlistment with Company C of the 8th Vermont Infantry Regiment and traveled from Vermont to Louisiana, where he quickly became ill.  He died on March 31st, 1864 presumably of disease; one of 241 from the regiment that died of such causes.

This photo just arrived in the mail from an eBay auction where the name of the soldier was not revealed.  Luckily, I was able to tweak the lighting/contrast with photoshop to discover the name of the soldier before I bid.  CSI: Civil War style!

Henry N. Derby
Brennan C. Gauthier Collection

Brattleboro Backmark

Henry N. Derby Grave in Chalmette National Cemetery, LA
Source: http://vermontcivilwar.org/cem/virtual/getnatcem.php?input=13809
Photographer: Dan Taylor

Here’s a great link to a Vermont Historical Society collection from a Vermont soldier who also served with the 8th VT and also died in Louisiana.

http://www.vermonthistory.org/index.php/george-e-parker-letters.html

WWI 26th Yankee Division, 103rd Machine Gun Battalion Vermont Dog Tag Grouping


103rd MG Dog Tag

VT NG Dog Tag

WWI Soldier Registry Entry

Daughters of the American Revolution Application

Grave Site in St. Albans

Evarts

Followers of PoW will know that I love WWI Vermont material.  I actively seek interesting groupings of World War 1 items  to add to my collection; today I was able to add a wonderful little piece of 26th Division and Vermont history.  This set of dog tags once belonged to a Joseph Allen Evarts from St. Albans, VT.  Originally born in Swanton, Evarts attended Norwich in 1904 and eventually joined up with the 1st VT National Guard.  He was a direct descendent of the famous Allen family and can claim Ethan Allen as a great-great-uncle.  He went overseas in October of 1917 with the 101st Machine Gun Battalion as a 1st LT and was promoted to Captain in August of 1918.   He was assigned as Company Commander of Company D of the 103rd Machine Gun Battalion of the 26th Division.  Evarts was well loved by the citizens of St. Albans and was sorely missed after he passed away in 1920 from gas-related lung complications.

He was cited at least two times for bravery while overseas and likely saw a lot of combat.  I was able to track down an interesting article with some original material from Evarts:

PICTURE PROVES HIM A PRISONER

Lieut. Evarts Writes of Seeing Tenney’s Photo in Group of Men Missing

Arthur G. Tenney, of Fairfield st., received a letter Saturday from Lieut. Joseph A. Evarts, of this city, who is with the American Expeditionary Forces in France, saying that he had seen a German propagandist paper in which was a picture of those missing in action at a certain place on the American line and among them was Lieut. Walter M. Tenney, of this city. Lieutenant Tenney was reported missing in action April 20. He went from this city over a year ago as second lieutenant in the machine gun company of which Evarts was first lieutenant. The company was later divided and Lieutenant Tenny went with a division composed of Connecticut and Massachusetts men while Lieutenant Evarts remained with St. Albans men. In his letter Lieutenant Evarts says that he and his command were stationed just to the left of where Lieutenant Tenney was.

The portion of the letter received here by Mr. Tenney, which tells of the picture is as follows:

“In Trenches, “June 12, 1918.

“Mr. Arthur Tenney, St. Albans, Vt.

“Dear sir:–

“I have just received a St. Albans Messenger that tells about Walter being missing in action.

“I have something that may be of interest to you.

“Today a few German planes came over spreading propaganda in newspaper form printed in French. The boys brought me some of them, and to my surprise I found it was an illustrated paper, and had a group picture of those missing in action at the place where Walter was. I recognized quite a few, and Walter was very plainly among them, and all of we boys recognized him. I have all the details and the picture with me.

“I felt that you would want to know this right away, and I must say it was a strange coincidence.

“If Walter ever writes you, will you write me and let me know about him?

“Our boys were in a big fight just to the left of where Walter was.***

“Sincerely, “J. A. Evarts.”

St. Albans Daily Messenger, St. Albans, VT 4 Jul 1918

Another article of interest:

ALBANS GIVES
ROYAL WELCOME
Greeting for City’s Home-Corn-ing
Boys Is Wildly
Enthusiastic
St. Albans, April 30. Capt. Joseph B.
Evarts, First Llouts. Walter Tenney,
James McConncll, Francis Shannon, Ar
nold Spauldlng, and 13 members of the
original Machine Gun company from
St. Albans returnod this evening nt
0:40. Thoy were mot at tho station by
Co. E, V. V. M St. Albans Brigade band
and tho Boy Scouts and thousands of
their friends. Tho boys wero escorted
to tho armory by the band, Company K.
and tho Boy Scouts. Tho armory wns
lined with a Bolld mans of people, can
non boomed, bolls rang, whistles blow
and tho people shouted a welcome home
to their boys.
At tho armory tho boys were served
with hot coffoo doughnuts, lco-cronm
and cake.
At 4:30 a. m. Tuesday the military
call was sounded which was a signal
to notify St. Albanians that tho boys
were coming on train No. 1 at C:30
oclock. During Monday evening Wel
come Homo signs had been hung up
on Lake street and flags hung from tho
business places. Tho exterior of tho
armory was gayly decorated with flags
and bunting. With tho sounding of mil
itary call whistles and bells did all that
was possible to awake tho inhabitants
of St. Albans. The members of Com
pany 11, V. V. M., assembled at the
armory and marched down to tho train.
Only a few St. Albans boys appeared,
but they wore given a royal welcome,
by tho largo crowd that had assembled
at tho railroad station. Company E.
had prepared hot coffee, sandwiches
and doughnuts, but only two return
ing soldiers appeared at the armory.
so tho members of tho company enjoyed
an unexpected repast. Among tho boys
who returned Tuesday morning were,
Harris W. Alexander, Dewey Daniels,
John Daley, Herbert Laduo and Earl
Swlggott.

Memorial Day 2012 Post – John McCrae: WWI University of Vermont Professor and Author of “In Flanders Fields”


What better way to remember Memorial Day than to post the most famous war poem of all time?  This poem was written by Lt. John McCrae, a surgeon with a Canadian field artillery unit during the Second Battle of Ypres on May 3rd, 1915.  The poem became an almost instant hit with the troops and with the homefront community “across the pond”.

What makes McCrae so special to me?  He taught at my alma mater, the University of Vermont, between 1903 and 1911 where he taught Pathology in Williams Hall.  I spent four years studying anthropology and archaeology in the hallowed halls of Williams, making my connection to McCrae even stronger.

This post is dedicated to all those who never returned home from the killing fields of France, Belgium, and Germany during WWI.

 In Flanders Fields

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived,  felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie,
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw

The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

McCrae entry from The University of Vermont in the Great War

WWI 2nd Cavalry Postal Cover Letter – Fort Ethan Allen Vermont Letter January 1918 – Good Details!


Followers of PortraitsofWar will know that I was lucky enough to acquire a great letter written by a member of the 2nd Cav while the unit was stationed at Fort Ethan Allen in my current hometown of Colchester, Vermont.  Obviously anything related to Fort Ethan Allen will be of interest to me and, by association, PortraitsofWar.  The letter was written by a Mr. Everett Hall from Connecticut, and includes some good cavalry related details as well as some tongue-in-cheek Vermont humor.  Alright!

Fort Ethan Allen,

January 18th, 1919

Dear Marion,

Your welcome letter received.  Also the postal.

Tell Kermit I thank him very much for the wash cloth.  It is a dandy and will be fine when we get over accross(sic). And the way things look now we may be over anytime.

We are having fine weather now.  Lots of snow, nearly three feet, weather is war.  About zero. {YES!  Awesome line}

I am getting so I can stick pretty good bareback. We get fifty munutes every other day monkey drill now.

Just got my last two test papers back.  I got a 98 on first aid and a 91 on guard duty. We have school every day on military matters.  And a test about three times a week.

Just like going to school again only that its different studies.   Have to use algebra too.  We have to study everything first aid for both men and horses.  And the best way of defeating an enemy.  Learn someting new every day.

There’s lots of Manchester fellows in now.  That man you spoke about, Thrall, is here. I heard his name called the other day.  I haven’t seen him to know him yet. Funny how you meet people you used to know.

I see both of A.L. Brown’s boys are going and Allen Balch.  I went to school with Marion Brown.

Well there’s not much news so I guess I’ll have to stop and get fixed up for inspection tomorrow.

We have all kinds of inspections now that we are getting ready for leaving.

With lots of love,

Everett

WWI Fort Ethan Allen 2nd Vermont Cav. Detailed Letter – Officer Shot in the Head! – Vermont WWI Content


The 2nd Vermont Cavalry trained at Fort Ethan Allen in Colchester Vermont prior to WWI and, after training, shipped off to France to fight with the only US cavalry unit during the war.  I currently live only ten minutes from the fort, and have previously posted a panoramic photo from an infantry regiment that trained there as well.  Collecting WWI Vermont items can be hard; the material seems to never come up to auction.  In this case, I was able to find a little nugget of Vermont history hidden amongst the seemingly endless WWI eBay listing section.

Looks like Clarence “Everett” Hall was originally from Manchester, Connecticut.  In his letter he mentions a number of interesting topics, including the everyday life of a cavalry troop as well as an interesting encounter where he inadvertantly shoots an officer in the head!  A great read, and a must for any fan of WWI cav.

 

Postmarked Burlington on July 30th, 1917.

Clarence Everett Hall

Fort Ethan Allen

Troop M. 2nd Vermont Cav.

July 28th, 1917

Dear Marion,

Your welcome letter received.  Will write while I have time.

Haveing(sic) a little better weather now.  It was 102 Wednesday on the range.  We was shooting for record shoot slow and rapid fire.  At slow you can take all the time to shoot you want.  Fire at 300, 500 and 600 yards slow fire.  Ten shots or rounds at each.  At 300 yards the bullseye is twelve inches across.  At 500 and 600 yards its twenty inches across.  If you hit the bullseye it counts as 5, the next ring 4, next 3 , rest 2 if you miss hitting the target it counts as nothing.  Then targets are like this.

On rapid fire we shoot 200, 300 and 500 yards.  At 200 yards have one minute to fire ten rounds.  Sitting from standing that time.  Fire sitting.  The shells are five in a clip.  And are loaded that way.  Have one clip in before the time starts and load the others after.  At 300 yards have one minute and ten seconds.  Prone from standing.  At 500 yards have one minute and twenty seconds to fire 10 rounds in.  And fire prone, laying down before the time starts.  The rapid fire target represents a mans head and shoulders.  And count the same.  The bullseye is forty inches across.

The higher score you get the better it is.  252 points gives you expert rifleman, that pays fire dollars a month extra.  238 gives you sharpshooter, that pays you three dollar a month.  202 pays two dollars a month and is marksman.  Nobody in the troop got expert several got sharpshooter, and several marksman.  I had marksman easy till the last.  Had an accident then.  Some of the shells are what are called slow fires.  That is they go off four or five seconds after you pull the trigger.  I had one, it went off on the ground after I ejected it from the gun.  The bullet hit an officer in back of me in the head, making a bad scalp wound.  The shell hit me in the leg cutting it about an inch.  It’s allright(sic) now but it sure did sting at first.  I got 200 points, only needed two more for marksman.

Besides the rifle we have a pistol, 45 automatic Colt.  Had no practice with them yet.  Besides that we have a saber.  Like a sword.  Straight and about three and a half feet long.  At full pack, “thats when we are ready for a long march we have the following.” One saddle, one saddle blanket, that foes on the horse, one surscingle, one pair saddle bags, they go on the read of the saddle.  In the saddle bag is carried everything for the horse.  Curry comb, brush, etc.  In the rear one is the man stuff messkit.  Knife, fork and spoon and any other little thing you want to carry.  The canteen in carried on the rear saddle packet the tin cup in the center of the loops.  The picket pin carried in the off pocket.  On front of the saddle is rolled overcoat (in winter), slicker in summer.  On rear is the blanketroll.  In that is one bed blanket, half a shelter tent, tent pole and rope and five tent pins, one suit underwear, two pair socks, one towel, soap, comb, toothbrush and paste.  The rifle goes in a boot on the near side, the saber on the off.  The pistol is carried in a holster on the belt which is worn.  Ninety rounds of rifle ammunition, thirty pistol and two pistol magazines and a first aid package make up the belt, which has suspenders so you can carry quite a little. The rest of out clothing etc. is put in a bag and carried in the wagons.  We just use the saddle for regular drill.

We have revellie, first call 5:15 roll call 5:30, breakfast at 6, drill at 7 until 10:30 mounted stables, that’s grooming the horses until 10:50.  11 till 11:30 dismounted drill with rifles.  12 dismiss.  In the afternoon if its not to(sic) hot have rifle, pistol, sabre drill.  Semaphore and wigwag practice, that’s sending messages with one and two flags.  Saturdays we have inspections of everything.  No drilling, afternoon off.  Sundays off except stables and water call.  Water call is 4:30.  Water and tie up the horses then.  5:30 retreat and supper.  Tatoo at nine, taps at eleven.  We have to put all lights out in the squad room at nine.

We have a nice building to sleep in .  Have a large day room downstairs, music library etc. there.  Shower, baths, etc. in the basement.  Have regular bunks to sleep in with springs, sheets, pillows etc.  There’s 105 in the troop.  Theres 15 troops in a regiment, four squadrons, three troops to a squadron and three troops over A.B.C, D.E.F, G.H.I, K.L.M, machine gun troop, supply and headquarters troops.

That’s all I can think off(sic) to tell about.  If I think of anything more that’s interesting I will tell it next time.  There’s talk of our leaving here the fifteenth of August for Worcester, Mass.  Be there for good.  Hope so.  This place is all right now but in the winter it gets to 45 below.  That’s too cold. 

I suppose there’s lots from Manchester drafted that don’t like it.  Don’t blame them.  For six months they will wish they were dead.  The first training is very hard.

Guess I will close now its time for retreat and if I write much more I’ll have to send this parcel post.

With Love,

Everett

Clarence E. Hall

WWI University of Vermont Alumni 1917 – Missing in Action – USS Cyclops, Carroll Goddard Page


Page in Washington, D.C – Courtesy of The University of Vermont Special Collections

 

One of the biggest naval mysteries of WWI is the inexplicable loss of the USS Cyclops while transporting 300+ passengers and a load of manganese from Brazil to Baltimore.  Carroll Goddard Page, UVM Class of 1917, was aboard as paymaster when the ship disappeared without a trace on March 4th, 1918.  Although a structural failure in the engine is likely the cause, we may never know the true reasons behind the disappearance.
Carroll was a member of the Class of 1917, originally from Hyde Park, he studied business and banking at UVM.  His nickname was “flunko”, and his ambitions at UVM included “raising a mustache that resembles a cross between the Kaiser’s and a hair-lip.”

1917 Yearbook Entry

Carroll’s Alumni Database Entry

Special thanks to the University of Vermont Special Collections!

The University of Vermont at War – Draftees in 1918 – Williams Hall at UVM


UVM SATC (Photo Courtesy of UVM Special Collections)


Drafted UVM Students (Photo Courtesy of UVM Special Collections)

My search for WWI Vermont photography continued this week at the University of Vermont’s Special Collections Annex.  Utilizing the Louis McAllister Collection database, I was able to track down two panoramic photographs taken at UVM in 1918.  This particular shot was taken in front of Williams Science Hall located on the UVM green.  I spent much of my time as an undergraduate studying in this building, so this photograph is particularly close to my heart.

This first photo was taken by McAllister on October 31st, 1918.  The new class of the S.A.T.C. was just inducted on October 23rd, just a week before this photo was taken.  Although the quality of the image is lacking, the content speaks volumes.

The second photo was taken a few months earlier, in July of 1918, and shows the first round of students from UVM to be drafted.  McAllister enjoyed using the Williams Hall entrance as a backdrop for his photographs; this is a panoramic style we see until the early 1960s.

While searching for reference material, I came across this advertisement from the 1918 Ariel yearbook of UVM.  It looks like Louis McAllister was a supporter of UVM!

Courtesy of UVM Special Collections

Special thanks to the UVM Special Collections crew for helping me with my search.  All photos in this post are courtesy of UVM Special Collections.