WWI Panoramic Photo – Bumpkin Island Boston Harbor, Massachusetts Navy Training Center 1917 (LARGE PHOTO – BEWARE)


Bumpkin Island 1917

Bumpkin Island 1917

 

I love digitizing WWI panoramic photos and the photo found above is a great example of an interesting panoramic with some good New England history behind it.  The image was shot in front of Burrage Hospital on Bumpkin Island, one of the Boston Harbor islands.  The camp was used by the U.S. Navy as a training camp.

The Burrage Hospital originally comprised a main hospital building measuring 175’ x 160’, two large covered open-air play houses, a bathing pavilion and a dock. The hospital is near the center of the island, about 80’ above the low water mark and faces south. Its general plan is that of a widened letter “H,” with an extension from the middle of the building back and contained three stories and a basement.

According to David J. Russo:

On the north side of the building, the basement was above ground because of the grading of the island. The south side contained two solariums on both the first and second floors (one set each for boys and girls) and the administrative offices. The two wings of the building contained the hospital wards and measured 25’ x 105.’

Along the front of the building and partly around the sides, ran a porch ten feet wide.

On the interior was a series of ramps between floors to make it easier for those who could not climb stairs, either due to disability or because confinement to wheelchair. This is likely one of the first uses of such ramps in a hospital setting.

The first floor contained an entry vestibule, reception room, matron’s room, matron’s bedroom, nurses room, pharmacy, doctors’ office, doctors’ bedrooms, four large wards, two small wards, two lavatories, four ward bathrooms, clothes storage room, two sewing rooms, linen closet, dining room, administration room, scullery and storage room.

The second floor was divided into four principal large wards, seven small wards, library, suite of three rooms, students’ room, three lavatories, four bathrooms, six bedrooms for hospital staff, operating room, sterilizing room, surgeons’ room, bandage room, etherizing room, and recovery room.

The attic held five dormitories, six closets and bathrooms. In the basement were two mens’ rooms, four lavatories, two furnace rooms, store rooms, play rooms, coal room, laundry room, drying room, cold storage room and ice room.

The exterior was composed of yellow brick, terra cotta, Indiana limestone trim and a green slate roof. Overall, the building took on the form of a seaside cottage, complete with symmetrical gables and ample porches.

During WWI, the island was taken over for use as a U.S. Naval Training camp, with the hospital serving as the Administration Building. The camp was dismantled after the war. The hospital reopened briefly in about 1940 for polio patients but closed during WWII, and burned in 1946.

 

 

 

 

WWI Nurse Photo Identified – Massachusetts Female Veteran in France, 1918 Base Hospital #6


I’ve been lucky in the past few weeks to pick up some fun WWI shots of US female nurses and auxiliary service members.  US women in France were outnumbered by the men, and to be able to positively identify a nurse is a fun way to learn about female service roles during the war.  In this case, I was able to purchase a small group of photos and a Thanksgiving menu from a woman in Base Hospital #6 stationed in Bordeaux, France during the war.  The standing studio portrait was identified on the reverse as HK Judd of Base Hospital 6.  On a whim I searched for Helen K. Judd (thinking that Helen was a likely candidate for H) and came up with a positive hit on a woman named Helen K. Judd from Southhampton, Mass.  I cross referenced with the digitized passport records from 1917 and 1918 and had a positive match.  Luckily the passport applications come with little snapshots of the applicants.   The amount of material available to identify WWI photos is incredible.

 

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J. Sereni Studio Portrait of Helen

J. Sereni Studio Portrait of Helen

 

1917 Passport Photo of Helen

1917 Passport Photo of Helen

1918 Passport Photo of Helen

1918 Passport Photo of Helen

 

Physical Description

Physical Description

Passport Application Info

Passport Application Info

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Base Hospital #6 Thanksgiving Menu

Base Hospital #6 Thanksgiving Menu

WWI 26th Division Photo Identified – Leo Hayden of Natick, MA, Company L, 101st Infantry, 26th “Yankee Division”


Anyone who follows this blog knows that I’m from New England and have a particular interest in the history of the 26th Division given it’s designation as the New England “Yankee” Division.  I’ve had this photo for a few years and recently decided to reexamine it to hopefully find some extra info on the veteran.  Low and behold I was able to discover a treasure trove of info on his service during WWI.  A particularly fine pose showing the two wound chevrons and the OS stripes, this shot is one of my favorites from the 26th Division.

Leo Hayden was a member of Company L of the 101st Infantry Regiment of the 26th Division.  He is buried in St. Patrick’s Cemetery in Natick, MA.

One mysterious point about the image is the fact that he is wearing a 104th Infantry Regiment collar disc but is listed as being a 1st Sgt. with the 101st Infantry.  Is it possible that he was moved to the 104th prior to shipping stateside?

Leo Posed in Studio

Leo Posed in Studio

 

Veteran Grave Card

Veteran Grave Card

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